The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes You Can Ever Have


For the Love of Bao, The Asian Street Food

I love the Most popular Korean food dishes. Korean food is very flavourful, so it depends on your liking. I like anything SPICY. Korean BBQ is not too bad, too; their marinated chicken and pork can be rather useful. Their bibimbap (mixed rice) is not too bad, sold in usually a piping hot ceramic pot with sauces you can incorporate.

 There is also street food! Street food brings out the ‘Korean feel’ because there is a variety of food sold along the streets. Although it sounds unappetizing, once you’re in Korea, your impression changes. Their spicy rice cakes are tasty (tteobokki; level of spiciness depends on how much the seller adds when making these cakes), the fish cakes (Nepomuk or odeng; the hotness of the soup in your stomach feels really good esp in the cold weather), there is also hot pancake sold w sugar (it is really good because it’s warm and fresh), There are also potatoes/sweet potatoes sold with brown sugar (sounds simple but it is REALLY GOOD)

The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes You Can Ever Have
The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes You Can Ever Have

What Are The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes Like?

I’ve had Korean food hundreds of times at Korean restaurants in Champaign (IL), Chicago (IL), and Dallas (TX). These restaurants were run and patronized by ethnic Koreans. Some of these restaurants were recommended to me by my Korean colleagues and friends. I should add that I’ve only had Korean food once in South Korea (Inchon airport actually), and so the Korean food I’ve had may not be representative of native Korean cuisine.

 In general, Korean food is similar to Chinese food in terms of ingredients and preparation. I would consider it closer to authentic Chinese cuisine than the average Chinese take-out, which many would consider a culinary travesty.

The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes You Can Ever Have
The Most Popular Korean Food Dishes You Can Ever Have

 Differences Between Korean And Chinese Dishes

However, there are some noticeable differences between Korean and Chinese cooking. I’ll list them out here.

1. Koreans tend to eat a lot of pickled/fermented stuff (squid, cabbage, fish fry, onions, potatoes, etc.). It’s not just Kimchee. They also use a lot of sugar and chili pepper in their pickles. Pickling is used to some extent in Chinese cuisine but not as much. Chinese pickles are also less creative and appetizing IMO.

2. Chinese cooking (especially in South China) tends to emphasize a lot of wok stir-frying; this isn’t in use in Korean cuisine. Stir fry isn’t Korean. Instead, they use a lot more BBQ-ing, which is similar to Japanese-style teppanyaki. I could be wrong, though.

3. Related to the above point is the absence of stir-fried vegetables in Korean cuisine. Koreans tend to eat their vegetables raw or pickled.

4. Korean cuisine has more grilling than roasting, whereas the Chinese prefer roasting rather than grilling in general.

5. Korean food tends to be spicy. Chili pepper is in use liberally. This is a little extreme from my perspective, although I do enjoy spicy food a lot. A result of this is that my Korean friends and colleagues tend to enjoy Thai food a lot.

6. Korean cuisine doesn’t appear to use Oyster sauce, which is mostly a South Chinese thing.

7. South Korean cuisine uses a lot of meat (chicken, pork, and beef) than the Chinese.

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